Skip to main content

11 min read
Himank Chaudhary

Tigris is an open source developer data platform that makes building data-rich serverless applications a breeze. It enables developers to stick to just being developers and not be forced into DevOps.

Tigris uses FoundationDB's transactional key-value interface as its underlying storage engine. In our blog post Skipping the boring parts of building a database using FoundationDB we went into the details of why we chose to build on FoundationDB. To recap, FoundationDB is an ordered, transactional, key-value store with native support for multi-key strictly serializable transactions across its entire keyspace. We leverage FoundationDB to handle the hard problems of durability, replication, sharding, transaction isolation, and load balancing so we can focus on higher-level concerns.

We are starting a series of blog posts that go into the details of how Tigris has been implemented. In the first post of the series, we will share the details of how we have built the multi-model document layer on top of FoundationDB. We will cover the topics of data layout, and schema management.

How we architected Tigris

6 min read
Ovais Tariq

Data is the lifeblood of modern applications, powering rich and diverse user experiences. We rely on these applications in our daily life to do everything from managing logistics, finances, shopping needs, and even the most mundane and basic of tasks.

However, as much as these modern applications have become data-dependent, the supporting data infrastructure hasn't evolved to support these rich data needs. Today's applications still rely on "databases" in the classical sense, a concept designed in the 1970s and 1980s.

11 min read
Anshuman Bhardwaj

The client-server model is one of the most used patterns in web development. In its simplest form, the client-server model can be described as a resource seeker (client) requesting the resource from a computer (server) serving it.

Advancements in web technologies have intensified the need for real-time client-server interactions. Protocols like WebSocket solve many of the problems in the older client-server model. WebSocket provides convenient bidirectional communication between the client and server while allowing messages to be broadcast among a variety of clients. But its flexible approach encourages bad practices among developers, such as not setting up an API contract for request/response or overusing WebSockets where HTTP would do fine. Its overuse has caused it to lose its essence.

HTTP/2鈥攖he successor of the HTTP protocol鈥攑rovides advantages over its predecessor, such as multiplexing and server push. Although it's a significant improvement over HTTP/1, HTTP/2 is not a replacement for WebSockets. So what is the future of real-time client-server interactions?

In this article, you'll learn more about real-time client-server interactions as well as the HTTP/2 and WebSocket protocols and their use cases. If you're planning to build real-time interactions, you'll be able to choose the right tools for your application needs.

5 min read
Ovais Tariq
Complexity to Simplicity with Tigris
  • Launch to offer open source and serverless API-based developer data platform in order to solve problems around scalability, search and support
  • Platform based on open source database FoundationDB, and backed by leading figures in the world of open source as well as General Catalyst, Basis Set Ventures and Netlify

10 min read
Himank Chaudhary
Yevgeniy Firsov

Building a new database

The most complicated and time-consuming parts of building a new database system are usually the edge cases and low-level details. Concurrency control, consistency, handling faults, load balancing, that kind of thing. Almost every mature storage system will have to grapple with all of these problems at one point or another. For example, at a high level, load balancing hot partitions across brokers in Kafka is not that different from load balancing hot shards in MongoDB, but each system ends up re-implementing a custom load-balancing solution instead of focusing on their differentiating value to end-developers.

This is one of the most confusing aspects of the modern data infrastructure industry, why does every new system have to completely rebuild (not even reinvent!) the wheel? Most of them decide to reimplement common processes and components without substantially increasing the value gained from reimplementing them. For instance, many database builders start from scratch when building their own storage and query systems, but often merely emulate existing solutions. These items usually take a massive undertaking just to get basic features working, let alone correct.

4 min read
Ovais Tariq
Complexity to Simplicity with Tigris

Join the Tigris waitlist and be the first to try the new open-source developer data platform for your next application

Over the past year, we鈥檝e been building a revolutionary new data platform for developers to handle all their applications鈥 data needs without all the data infrastructure complexity. This is the first truly open source developer data platform available with a simple yet powerful, unified API that spans search, event streaming, and transactional document store. It enables you to focus on building your applications and stop worrying about the data infrastructure.

One min read
Ovais Tariq

We're excited to announce that Tigris Data has joined Netlify's Jamstack Innovation Fund as one of the 10 most promising Jamstack startups.

Tigris Data joins Netlify's Jamstack Innovation Fund

As the world increasingly shifts to digital-first interactions, the need for fast, reliable, and secure web applications has never been greater. The Jamstack movement is a response to this need, focused on building web applications that provide rich experiences while at the same time being easy to deploy and scale. Data is, of course, crucial to building rich experiences, and the support from Netlify will accelerate our mission to provide the fast, reliable and secure data layer that Jamstack applications need to thrive.

7 min read
Ovais Tariq

In our inaugural blog post Hello world, we talked about the problem of data infrastructure sprawl that, over the years, has complicated modern application development, while putting a lot of burden on the operations team who must manage, maintain and secure many different databases and technologies.

In this blog post, we鈥檒l explain what we mean when we say "data infrastructure sprawl" by walking through a typical example, and then we鈥檒l explain why it doesn鈥檛 have to be this way.

3 min read
Ovais Tariq
Himank Chaudhary
Yevgeniy Firsov

We're excited to announce the launch of Tigris Data, a company on the mission of simplifying data management for developers.

Over the years, data has become increasingly complex and difficult to manage. Developers have had their lives made exponentially more difficult due in large part to all these different technologies, data models, APIs, and databases they're expected to put together to build modern applications.

The database sprawl also puts a lot of pressure on operations teams, who must manage, maintain and secure these different databases and technologies. Then there is the onerous task of operationalizing these databases across multiple different cloud platforms.

Complexity to Simplicity with Tigris